Archive for the ‘Research’ Category

Thyroid Hormones

I am posting this because I have discovered this problem in myself and hope to help others who might be struggling with seemingly unrelated symptoms that could add up to something that you may want to get checked out. In the last few months I have steadily gained weight without changing anything in my diet, have been very fatigued at least a few times a week, am super-sensitive to cold temperatures, and lose more hair than normal. The fatigue part is what made me worried because it has appeared only recently; the hair loss and cold sensitivity I thought was just part of my genes or something and I have dealt with that for years. And the recent weight gain I linked to the fatigue, because whenever I didn’t feel well, I ate, thinking that hunger symptoms were showing themselves in other ways besides stomach growls. And when I felt tired, of course I couldn’t exercise but had to rest instead. So I have been consuming many more calories than I have been expending. No mystery there. But having the continued fatigue and weakness on a regular basis made me think I had a blood sugar problem at first so I went in for bloodwork. Continue reading

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Soft Drink Consumption = Bone Loss

Reasons why consuming soft drinks might be bad for bone health:

  • drinking soda instead of calcium-containing drinks leads to calcium deficiency
  • phosphoric acid in soda increases calcium loss (to neutralize this acid, calcium is stripped from the bone)
  • caffeine in soda increases calcium loss through the urine

You should be consuming around 1,000 mg of calcium per day. You can get calcium here: fortified orange juice, fortified soy milk, collard greens, kale, cabbage, bok choy, fortified tofu, broccoli, turnip greens, cauliflower, brussels sprouts, or a calcium supplement.  Continue reading

Vitamin A

I plan for this to be the first post in a series about vitamins. I figured I’d start in ABC order, which is in fact how the vitamins were named — in the order they were ‘discovered’. In my Introductory Nutrition class we are learning about vitamins and minerals, so I happily share my new knowledge here. Continue reading

What I learned about proteins

In my Introductory Nutrition class this week, we learned all about proteins. I use the plural term because the singular protein is misleading – there are possibly unlimited quantities of unique types of proteins in living things. Most of the proteins in humans are made from combinations of only 20 amino acids. Of those twenty we usually hear about the 9 Essential amino acids, which are: Continue reading

HIIT: High Intensity Inverval Training

I discovered HIIT on YouTube one day when I was putting together my own mix of exercises via iMovie on the Mac. I was watching a video from user CharlieJames1975 and was bewitched by the tiny girl’s accent and killer body. Currently there is an English girl doing the videos, named Lisa, but it was Zuzanna who originally got me going on the bodyrock.tv kick.

HIIT is where you do very intense moves that incorporate all muscles of your body into a short amount of time (usually 10-20 minutes). Continue reading

Eggs: good or bad?

On a personal note my first answer would be “bad” right away because of the unnecessary animal use. But let’s say I am a non-animal-lover, the way non-vegans are. Is there value in eating these unborn bird fetuses?

Let’s first talk cholesterol. You don’t like to have high cholesterol, right? And that is mostly why you stay away from burgers, right? Well take a look at the comparisons in the table below1,3:

Cholesterol (mg) Food
87 Whopper from Burger King
94 Quarter Pounder with Cheese from McDonald’s
150 Double Down from KFC
160 Double Quarter Pounder with Cheese from McDonald’s
212 one large egg

Continue reading

The New Four Food Groups

The USDA’s Basic Four Food Groups appeared in the 1950’s:

(1) meats, poultry, fish, dry beans and peas, eggs, and nuts
(2) dairy products, such as milk, cheese, and yogurt
(3) grains
(4) fruits and vegetables

Until 1992 this combo of foods was the central component of nutrition education in the US and it was believed to be the final word on nutrition by all Americans. Then there was the Food Guide Pyramid:

According to Harvard School of Public Health, “the information embodied in this pyramid didn’t point the way to healthy eating. Its blueprint was based on shaky scientific evidence.” Then in 2005 the USDA introduced MyPyramid, which Harvard calls “the old Pyramid turned on its side, sans any explanatory text” that brought many critics. Continue reading