Posts Tagged ‘diet’

Thyroid Hormones

I am posting this because I have discovered this problem in myself and hope to help others who might be struggling with seemingly unrelated symptoms that could add up to something that you may want to get checked out. In the last few months I have steadily gained weight without changing anything in my diet, have been very fatigued at least a few times a week, am super-sensitive to cold temperatures, and lose more hair than normal. The fatigue part is what made me worried because it has appeared only recently; the hair loss and cold sensitivity I thought was just part of my genes or something and I have dealt with that for years. And the recent weight gain I linked to the fatigue, because whenever I didn’t feel well, I ate, thinking that hunger symptoms were showing themselves in other ways besides stomach growls. And when I felt tired, of course I couldn’t exercise but had to rest instead. So I have been consuming many more calories than I have been expending. No mystery there. But having the continued fatigue and weakness on a regular basis made me think I had a blood sugar problem at first so I went in for bloodwork. Continue reading

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Blood Type Diets

This information is definitely worth checking out. There are tons of people who have erased all their health issues (and lost weight too, yay!) just by eating right for their specific blood type! I am only reading a supplemental text that goes along with the main blood type book (Eat Right 4 Your Type: The Individualized Diet Solution to Staying Healthy, Living Longer & Achieving Your Ideal Weight by Peter J. D’Adamo), but I intend to read that one soon. Meanwhile, here are some notes on eating for your blood type in general that I gathered from Blood Type A: Food, Beverage, and Supplement Lists by Dr. Peter J D’Adamo:

  • Your blood type is the “essential defining factor in your health profile”
  • Many foods stick to cells of certain blood types but not to others so that certain food might be bad for one blood type but good for another
  • Chemical reactions between blood and food we eat determine either a good or bad effect on your blood; when you consume foods incompatible with your blood type, certain proteins go and target your organs and blood cells start to stick in that area, therefore interfering with the normal body processes for those organs {NOT GOOD}
  • The blood type diet will “restore the natural protective functions of your immune system, reset your metabolic clock, and clear your blood of dangerous agglutinating lectins [the ‘certain proteins’ I referred to earlier]” Continue reading

What I Learned From My Homeopath

  1. Eat three meals a day instead of snacking frequently all day. This is because when we put time between meals we are giving the digestive system time to recuperate and rest. If you are regularly bombarding it with bits of food all day this rest won’t get to occur. This is going to be hard for me to change. For years I have been a grazer.
  2. Eat more raw food. I actually experimented with this in the last few weeks by keeping a food journal. I noticed that when I ate even a combo of raw and cooked foods, my energy levels dropped in the afternoon and I also wasn’t able to stay awake past 8:30pm. If I had a very small percentage of raw food in a day, I’d be crashing by 6:30pm and would sleep solid until 6am the next morning. On the days I was able to consume at  least 90% raw foods, not only did I not have my 2-o’clock slump time, but I stayed up almost until 10pm and still wasn’t all that tired as I made myself lie down for bedtime! It was awesome. It still is awesome since I am sticking to it now! Continue reading

How much of each nutrient do I need each day?

Messages from the media confuse us. We are told to make sure we’re getting enough protein. Then they tell us to focus on Omega-3 and Omega-6. Then we hear warnings about fiber deficiency. And on and on. Well, you should know for yourself what you need, and you find that out by following the Institute of Medicine’s Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs). They are broken down into age groups because not every age group or gender has the same consumption needs. It lists macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, fats, fiber) and micronutrients (vitamins & minerals). For example, my recommended carb intake for the age group of 31-50 years old is 130 grams per day. Continue reading

MyDietAnalysis online program: review

I am currently enrolled in Introductory Nutrition at a community college and I love it. I’m only in week two and have learned a good amount so far. One thing that stands out that I want to share and promote (not because I benefit from it but because I think it’s so helpful that everyone should try) is an online software program where you track what you eat (it’s totally customize-able) and what your extra activity is (besides the basic walking, standing, moving, etc.); you make a profile and answer some questions about your body and how sedentary or active your lifestyle is in general; and it will then compute EVERYTHING for you — Continue reading

Book Overview: The Kind Diet by Alicia Silverstone

Here are things I want to share with you that I learned from Alicia.

Animals on Factory Farms 

  • Animals at the slaughterhouse are in constant terror. Being scared produces body chemicals that affect the muscles and other parts of the body, namely cortisol and adrenaline. Humans can become stressed from eating this meat. You eat fear, despair, and anger when you eat the meat of a dead animal.
  • Slaughterhouse wastes are used in livestock feed (that you end up eating second hand) like blood, bone, remains of cats and dogs
  • Animals on factory farms are pumped with hormones to increase their mass. Hormones are not good — we have our own and don’t need more — because they lead to cancers like breast and prostate
  • Mercury damages your brain, kidneys, and lungs: swordfish, mackerel, and tuna have the highest levels of mercury out of all fish
  • “The meat industry has created entities like the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, the American Meat Institute, and the National Pork Producers Council, which spend millions and millions of dollars on print and television ads to cast their products in a positive light, despite evidence to the contrary” Continue reading

Cancer prevention guidelines

In 1997 the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute of Cancer Research published their expert report on dietary guidelines. Here are some of the exact quotes.

For Food Supply and Eating:

  • Population goal: “population to consume nutritionally adequate and varied diet based primarily on foods of plant origin
  • Individual guideline: “choose predominantly plant-based diets rich in a variety of vegetables and fruits, pulses (legumes), and minimally processed starchy staple foods”

For Meat:

  • Population goal: “if eaten at all, red meat to provide <10% total energy”
  • Individual guideline: “if eaten at all, limit intake of red meat to <80 g (3 oz) daily; it is preferable to choose fish, poultry, or meat from non-domesticated animals in place of red meat.” Continue reading